The 1887-88 Adelaide Jubilee International Exhibition & Building Book Project

Front face of Harry P Gill Medal, South Australian School of Art, University of South Australia. This medal is awarded annually to the student at the South Australian School of Art with the highest grade point average in the field of Design. The medal depicts Harry Pelling Gill in academic dress as an Associate Member of the Royal College of Art (ARCA) London, a position he claimed after 1899.

Front face of Harry P Gill Medal, South Australian School of Art, University of South Australia.
This medal is awarded annually to the student at the South Australian School of Art with the highest grade point average in the field of Design. The medal depicts Harry Pelling Gill in academic dress as an Associate Member of the Royal College of Art (ARCA) London, a position he claimed after 1899.

The 1887-88 Adelaide Jubilee International Exhibition & Building Book project, was first set up in June, 2014. The project is a collaboration between the Architecture Museum, School of Art, Architecture and Design, University of South Australia, the Professional Historians Association (SA), History SA and Crossing Press, Sydney. The aim of the project is to develop and publish an edited collection of illustrated chapters comprising essays and cameos that focus on the 1887-88 Adelaide Jubilee International Exhibition and Building.

VISION AND AIMS OF THE BOOK

The book aims to capture and convey the energy and vision behind the 1887-88 Exhibition, but not to be a straight description of it. It will also examine the Exhibition to discover what it can tell us about South Australia and about the people, society and culture of the time. In other words, it will consider whether or not there was a particular South Australian flavour to the Exhibition and in so doing, it will investigate South Australian identity, the 50th anniversary of the colony, and nationalism in the pre-federation period.

RELEVANCE TO THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL OF ART

The book will also include an overview of the post-Jubilee International Exhibition uses of the building. It is this post-exhibition aspect that is of relevance to the South Australian School of Art (SASA) and its History Project. When SASA was first set up in 1861 it was housed within the SA Institute Building on the corner of North Terrace and Kintore Avenue. Thirty years later in June 1891, the school relocated eastward down North Terrace to the Exhibition Building where it was to remain for the next 72 years.

 

DRAFT CHAPTER: SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL OF ART AT THE EXHIBITION BUILDING, 1891 - 1963

A draft chapter which focuses on the 72 years in which the South Australian School of Art was located in the Exhibition Building on North Terrace has been prepared by Dr Jenny Aland and forwarded to the Editorial Team on Wednesday June 4, 2015.